Category Archives: Viaduct Removal

National Calls Attention to City’s Proposal to Move Carrall Street

Residents of The National (1128 Quebec Street) have put out a document that shows serious concern over the City of Vancouver’s proposal to move Carrall eastward. The document outlines the City’s move that would allow more Concord Pacific condos on the shoreline and less waterfront park space.

“The most recent park design gives Concord Pacific more waterfront property to build residential towers, while shifting the Creekside Park extension to the area under the Skytrain line and next to the new six-lane Pacific Ave.”

“The original development plan for Creekside Park promised in 1990 was a contiguous east-west park alignment. Currently, the City of Vancouver is proposing a north-south alignment to the park, thus moving the park further away from the waterfront.”

You can read the original document here.

City of Vancouver to Hold Northeast False Creek Block Party

Here’s a chance to give your thoughts and input on the future of Northeast False Creek. The City of Vancouver is holding a Block Party to present an early draft of what they’ve heard over the last 10 months. We encourage all residents of False Creek to drop by and discuss the future of our community.

Where: Andy Livingston Park at Carrall Street.
When: Saturday, June 10, 11am – 7pm

 

VIDEO: Full House for the FCRA All-Candidates Meeting for Vancouver – False Creek

Over 100 people filled the room at Creekside Community Centre to hear the candidates from Vancouver – False Creek for the 2017 BC Provincial Election. It was a lively evening with interesting views on several issues of concern to residents of the area. The False Creek Residents Association is proud to have hosted this event. A big thanks to all in attendance, and especially to the six candidates who participated.

For those who couldn’t attend, here is a video of the entire meeting. Election day is May 9, and there are advance polls beforehand. Please get out and vote!

CBC: Viaduct-free visions: Vancouver Champs-Élysées or lost public waterfront park?

As our own Patsy McMillan from the False Creek Residents Association notes in this CBC article, there are still real concerns about the definition of the park, and specifics about the design of the roads what will replace the viaducts, and of course the issues about how the toxic soil will dealt with and where it will be put. We’re keeping a close eye.

Read:

Viaduct-free visions: Vancouver Champs-Élysées or lost public waterfront park? – CBC

Viaduct plan stirs controversy

While councillor questions money matters, residents are angry new park is years away

To listen to City of Vancouver staff, tearing down the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts will be a Viaductswin-win.

There won’t be much impact on traffic, there will be a bigger Creekside Park, and the $200-million cost of tearing down the massive structures will be covered by a projected $300 million in community amenity contributions, development cost levies and land sales in the neighbourhood.

But there are skeptics…

Most of the criticism of the plan for the viaducts was levelled at the timeline for Creekside Park, which may not be finished for another decade.

False Creek residents have been angry at the city and Concord Pacific for years because of delays in completing the park — there are an estimated 1,500 green lights hanging in windows throughout the neighbourhood as a protest.

On Tuesday, council voted in favour of a staff recommendation to tear down the viaducts. Green Coun. Adriane Carr tried to add an amendment that stated the park should be finished by 2024, but was rebuffed.

“The people of False Creek have been waiting 25 years for the delivery of Creekside Park,” she said. “Supposedly bringing down the viaducts will facilitate the faster development of that park, and certainly Vision has been lauding the park delivery as a key part of the viaducts decision.

“(But) when I put it into the form of an amendment, they said that would be a false promise, and they couldn’t necessarily deliver it, and it was out of our hands.”

Meggs voted against Carr’s amendment…READ MORE

ViaductsOriginalViaductsProtest

1971…original protest

Tear ‘em down or leave ‘em up: Public divided on Vancouver viaducts removal

Vancouverites aren’t universally sold on demolishing the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts as council is poised to determine their future – an infrastructure decision that could forever change the city’s east side and False Creek neighbourhoods…

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John Murray, director of the False Creek Residents Association, questioned whether residents will actually get a bigger park if the viaducts are removed. The new map simply shows a reconfigured park, he argued, and it won’t be adequate for the thousands of extra residents.

Read more…

Viaducts decision at City Council Oct 21

The FCRA has several concerns that we have repeatedly voiced.

First and foremost is the Creekside Park Extension. This park,  which includes the completion of the NEFC seawall, was a contractual obligation of Concord Pacific in the Original Development Plan in 1990. They have consistently delayed the delivery of this much needed park space by shifting the parameters of that responsibility.

Now the responsibility and the possibility have been shifted to the removal of the viaducts. They are attempting to get ‘buy in’ by making yet another promise—13.75 acres instead of the 9.06 acres that is already part of the contractual agreement. Those 13.75 acres now include the land under the viaduct previously allocated to youth hard surface recreation as well as the closure of Carrall St to north/south traffic effectively making that area “park space” and the new cycling/pedestrian bridge to Dunsmuir St. They now say there will be an early phase in of the seawall. So if it is possible now to provide a completed seawall why hasn’t it been possible before?  The timeline for the park as stated in the viaducts report is 2025.

Waiting another 10 years is not expediting the park.

The Park Board park space requirement is still on the books as 2.75 acres per 1,000 residents. This rationale was again ratified by the Park Board unanimously a couple of years ago. With a possible increased density of 2,500 residential units, as reported today, in order for the COV to sell enough density to pay $200 M for the viaduct removal and road changes there is absolutely no way that the community can bear that increase in population, not to mention traffic, without more offsetting green space. Where are the plans for the required social infrastructure to meet the needs of these thousands of more residents? No schools, community centres, daycares—just more and more density to contribute CACs for the viaduct removal ($200 M). If the COV is going to be negotiating with developers regarding community amenities we think that there should be more transparency in that negotiation and not just a presentation of a done deal a week before a report to council.

We still don’t know if there is a traffic plan for North/South arterial streets like Abbott, Carrall and Quebec Streets, other than the plan to close Carrall St to north/south traffic.

For anyone who lives here we see the huge volumes of traffic sitting bumper to bumper on both arms of the viaduct, especially the Dunsmuir viaduct, during rush hour and most importantly when there are concurrent events at the stadia. Or on the Park site.

There are still ongoing concerns re traffic in the 100 and 200 Blks of Prior St.  The city has promised that there will be 8 M setbacks to take the pressure of the new traffic pattern off the residents who now live in those blocks. The residents never expected to have to contend with 6 lanes of traffic outside their front door. There need to be assurances that this will be mitigated.

It is unfortunate that there are still many unanswered questions. Especially: Who will benefit and who will ultimately be paying for this? What do the city taxpayers actually get? What do the developers get?

Will we be looking at a wall of condo towers separating our neighbourhoods rather than the viaducts, which we can still see over and walk under? The skytrain will still be a divisive component between neighbourhoods as will a six-lane roadway, which will need to accommodate the 40,000 vehicles currently using the viaducts as well as the 22,000 vehicles currently using the surface roads.

The Green Light Campaign remains our silent signature protest for neighbourhood green space, which has brought the community together and inspired imagination of what might be possible.